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The Latest News On Astronomy For The Week

This is a list of 5 latest news on astronomy for the week. Be sure to check them out!

Aryan Mishra invites teens to astronomy | Science Wire | EarthSky

Aryan Mishra Aryan Mishra is a 15-year-old student in Delhi, India, who has a passion for astronomy. In 2014, he and Keerti Vardhan, another student, discovered a near-Earth asteroid during a nationwide asteroid search campaign. Now Aryan has more to say to teens around the world about the beauty and joys of astronomy. Read More…

Feature: New observatory aims to put Iranian astronomy on the map

INO has very good potential for becoming an important facility for astronomy in the world, not only in Iran, he adds. The telescope will study exoplanets and gamma ray bursts, hunt for dark matter, and probe galaxy formation. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, a religious hard-liner, was elected president in 2005, and his science minister took a dim view of the telescope project, Mansouri says. Read More…

Star Guide: Great Basin Astronomy Festival

The festival is held at Great BasinNational Park 387miles east of Reno, and is well-worth the six-hour drive for a payoff of more stars than you have ever seen. The park is heralded as one of the darkest National Parks in the continental United States, and its yearly astronomy festival features a wide variety of activities provided by park rangers, volunteersand sponsors. The festival is run by Kelly Carroll, supervisor of the park. Read More…

Japanese X-ray observatory completes decade-long mission | Astronomy Now

The Suzaku satellite spent a decade watching some of the most energetic parts of the cosmos, focusing on supernova explosions, black holes and galactic clusters, while peering back in time to study the structure of the universe billions of years ago. Suzaku launched on a Japanese M-5 rocket on 10 July 2005, replacing a similar craft lost in a launch failure in 2000. The spacecraft was originally called Astro-E2, but Japanese officials renamed it Suzaku after a legendary red bird from Chinese mythology. Read More…

So, these were the latest news on astronomy. Did you enjoy reading them?

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A Complete Guide To Buy A Travelers Telescope

A telescope is an equipment, especially used to view the night sky. A beautiful night sky traversal experience can be achieved with a good telescope. There are different telescopes available in the market like Newtonian reflector, Dobsonian reflector, catadioptric telescopes. This is a guide to buy a travelers telescope which can help you buy the best quality and inexpensive telescope. Different criteria determine the quality and price of the telescope such as mirror size, eyepiece quality, corrector lenses, mount, Moon filter, Barlow lens, prism inside the telescope etc.

Guide To Buy A Travelers Telescope Must Cover The Following Features.

• A traveler’s telescope must be portable because it will be easier to carry. The refractors should be portable and its mount must be divided into some manageable sections like tripod, main mount and counterweights. You can choose a catadioptric telescope because it has combined mirrors and lenses make a more compact tube which is available in 14-inch telescope.

• You can choose a Newtonian reflector which is the best option for beginners. Its design is very simple, cheap for mirror size (6-inch) and best for navies. Its mirror will help to view galaxies, the Moon and other planets in a brighter way. The Dobsonian telescope has simple mount and large mirrors which is very popular to view faint galaxies and nebulae. Its price is also relatively cheap compared to other design.

• Another type of telescope, catadioptric telescopes has a compact size and portable in nature. Its large focal ratios are very perfect for lunar and planetary observations. It also uses a combination of corrector lenses and mirrors. So, you can buy this type of telescope during travel.

• Some manufactures offer some accessories with telescope like a Moon filter, a Barlow lens which increases the magnification of eyepieces, an angled or prism which helps for comfortable viewing. You can buy a telescope from these brands like Sky-Watcher, Celestron, Orion, Bresser etc.

• Guide to buy a travelers telescope include to choose a heavier mount because it tends to more stability and portability. When choosing the mount, you can consider two types – the altaz and the equatorial mount. By using altaz mount, the telescope moves up and down (altitude) and left and right (azimuth). The equatorial mount moves in the order of longitude and latitude and also mapped to an imaginary region on the sky. You can choose the GEM (German equatorial mount) of your telescope. Newtonians telescope offers GEM.

• Some telescope brands like Acuter, Sky-Watcher, Celestron have built-in zoom eyepiece which increases magnification. These scopes are also attached to a normal photographic tripod, so they are useful for nature-spotting as well as astronomy. If you want to buy a versatile telescope, you must buy this type.

So, to buy a travelers telescope, you must focus on its specification. Do not stress on the magnification of the telescope, because a poor telescope can magnify many times. You should give attention to the lens quality, size of the telescope’s lens and main mirror, focal length, etc. Focal length is very important in respect of a telescope because it is the distance between a telescope’s main mirror and the image point. If you want to buy only travelers telescope, you should go for portable telescope.

Follow this guide to buy a travelers telescope and you will never fail or buy a bad telescope.

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A Complete Guide To The History Of Astronomy

If you are a science student or are curious to learn more about astronomy, you must first know the history of astronomy. That will help you delve deep into the astronomy subject and make you gain great knowledge about the subject.

So, without going further, I have compiled a list of 5 resources you can use to learn about the history of astronomy.

The history of galaxies unravelled for the first time | Astronomy Now

Abell 2667 is a rich galaxy cluster some 3,000 million light-years away in the constellation Sculptor. The combined mass of all the member galaxies is so great that the cluster acts as a gravitational lens. Abell 2667 shows a wide-ranging galaxy morphology in this image from the Hubble Space Telecope. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Kneib (Laboratorie d’Astrophysique de Marseille).A team of international scientists, led by astronomers from Cardiff University’s School of Physics and Astronomy, has shown for the first time that galaxies can change their structure over the course of their lifetime. Check out the full story here…

New Stars for Old: Stories from the History of Astronomy | Astronomy Now

Only one female astronomer, Hypatia, is represented, but there is a chapter about Tycho Brahe as told by his wife, who worked alongside him in his observatory. The stories are often written in a colloquial style, sometimes using the vernacular of the present day to make the narrative sound current. Some stories are presented as letters, others as conversations, some are told by the historical personalities themselves and others by real or fictional people who are connected with them in some way. Check out the full story here…

The History of Astronomy | Actforlibraries.org

The first crude telescopes began our long journey to astronomy, astrology, space travel, and the solar system in the 1600s, excitedly skipping down the yellow brick road toward literally another world. Born and dying in Hague, Christian Huygens lived an uneventful life, even though he is now credited with improving the telescope in 1654. Both he and his brother devised a more improved method of grinding and polishing the lenses of the telescope used at the time. Check out the full story here…

Egyptian Astronomy – History of Astronomy

The Ancient Egyptians made many great advances in science and contributions to the store of human knowledge, especially in medicine and alchemy. The Egyptians also contributed to ancient astronomy and, as with the Mesopotamians, their work was based upon agriculture and predicting the seasons. Check out the full story here…

Indian Astronomy – History of Astronomy

Indian astronomy was heavily tied to their religious and spiritual outlook of the world, but it contained many accurate observations of phenomena. The ancient Indian astronomers used the stars and the planets to create astrological charts and read omens, devising sophisticated mathematical models and developing many interesting theories, many of which passed into the Islamic world and Europe. The Rigveda shows that the Indians divided the year into 360 days, and the year was subdivided into 12 months of 30 days. Check out the full story here…

So, you have now got to learn about Egyptian astronomy, Indian astronomy and about the whole history of astronmy. Are you getting more curious?

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Bushnell Voyager 700x76mm Reflector Telescope Review

reflector telescope

Bushnell Company offers a variety of products about sports optics since 60 years. The Company is very reputable in the market and offers affordable, reliable, best quality optics products for sportsman and hobbyist. These products are mainly categorized into indoor and outdoor tech equipments like binoculars, GPS, trail cameras, reflector telescope, digital camera binoculars, flashlights, night vision goggles, velocity speed guns etc.

There are various telescopes in the market but Bushnell Voyager 700×76 mm reflector telescope is the perfect one for enjoying night-sky and learning astronomy. It has audio feature which offers great visual experience with audio tour through the sky at night. Individuals, especially kids, can learn various interesting facts about the night sky. Its LED backlight display is easily adjustable and one can easily jump to his/her chosen stars. Its illuminated buttons are excellent at night which attracts viewers. Its eyepieces are also very attractive and include 3 large 1.25’’ diameters. So, kids and beginners can easily use it at the night sky with clarity and without hassle.

The important features of Bushnell Voyager 700×76 mm Reflector Telescope is –

• It is an electronic handset that offers a real-time audio tour throughout the night sky. Its volume and language choice are easily adjustable.

• It gives a wonderful experience to the visitors in the respect of mythology, amazing planets and facts.

• Its perfect backlight LED display highlights the specific object and illuminated mount guides you to the objects.

• It easily positions your vision to your chosen stars by LED electronic red dot quickly.

• Its eyepieces are very large with 1.25’’ diameter.

• This product is available with Barlow lens and Sky Tour 789931.

The specifications of Bushnell Voyager 700×76 mm Reflector Telescope are –

• Its Model number is 789931.

• Eyepieces with 1.25’’ diameter.

• Its reflector is very high quality with 700×76 mm.

• Its focal length is about 700 mm.

• Its illuminated smart mount is very attractive.

According to various reviews of customers, the reflector telescope is very useful, interesting and attractive to the people and kids. But its manual is not up to date.

As it is a telescope used for beginners, its manual should be properly designed with complete information. But, various information like instruction for alignment of spotting scope is missing in the manual. As the manual is incomplete and unclear, at present talking handset appears which can give lots of features to the people. People easily attracts to this type of handset.

As there is lack of proper guidance for using this equipment, people ignore this telescope. So, the company should improve the different tools used to provide proper guidance to the user. After these improvements, Bushnell Voyager 700×76 mm reflector telescope would be very popular among people, especially kids. Individuals who have little or zero knowledge can easily use this product.

Bushnell should survey the market and determine its position, and then necessary changes should be done to this equipment for using this telescope with efficient sky tour feature. The efficient feature of this reflector telescope includes smart mount, focal length, eyepieces, magnifications, audio tour and sturdy pre-assembled construction.

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The return of the Andromeda Galaxy

This image of the Andromeda Galaxy, Messier 31, also shows its satellite galaxies, Messier 110 (top) and Messier 32 (lower right of M31’s nucleus). Dust lanes between the spiral arms of M31 can be seen in large amateur instruments, but the bright nucleus, M32 and M110 are easy targets for small telescopes. A 65mm f/6.5 refractor and Canon 1100D DSLR were used to capture this portrait of our largest galactic neighbour from rural Norfolk on 29 November 2013. Magnitude +4.5 nu (ν) Andromedae is the blue star in the lower left. Image credit: Ade Ashford.

Now that the British Isles are no longer experiencing twilight all night, keen observers are already looking forward to the ‘season of mists and mellow fruitfulness’ with its dark skies at a sociable hour. Is it too soon to be thinking of autumn? Possibly, but the equinox is almost five weeks away. Article Source…

ANDROMEDA GALAXY FACTS

The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way and is one of a few galaxies that can be seen unaided from the Earth. In approximately 4.5 billion years the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way are expected to collide and the result will be a giant elliptical galaxy. Andromeda is accompanied by 14 dwarf galaxies, including M32, M110, and possibly M33 (The Triangulum Galaxy).

Galaxy Profile

Designation: M31, NGC 224
Type: Spiral
Distance from Milky Way: 2.5 million light-years
Diameter: 260,000 light-years
Mass: 400 billion solar masses
Number of Stars: 1 trillion

Article Source…

Hubble Finds Giant Halo Around the Andromeda Galaxy

Scientists using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have discovered that the immense halo of gas enveloping the Andromeda galaxy, our nearest massive galactic neighbor, is about six times larger and 1,000 times more massive than previously measured. The dark, nearly invisible halo stretches about a million light-years from its host galaxy, halfway to our own Milky Way galaxy. This finding promises to tell astronomers more about the evolution and structure of majestic giant spirals, one of the most common types of galaxies in the universe. Article Source…

Andromeda Galaxy Is Surrounded by a Supersized Gas Halo

One of the Milky Way’s closest galactic neighbors is surrounded by a much bigger halo of gas than previously thought, new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope reveal.

The halo of the Andromeda Galaxy — the nearest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way — is about six times larger and 1,000 times more massive than measured before, the new observations show. It is so large that if the halo were visible from Earth, it would be 100 times the diameter of the full moon — or about the size of two basketballs held at arm’s length. Article Source…

Andromeda galaxy is Milky Way’s next-door neighbor

Although a couple of dozen minor galaxies lie closer to our Milky Way, the Andromeda galaxy is the closest major galaxy to ours. Excluding the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, which can’t be seen from northerly latitudes, the Andromeda galaxy – also known as M31 – is the brightest galaxy in all the heavens. It’s the most distant thing you can see with your unaided eye, at 2.3 million light-years. To the eye, it appears as a smudge of light larger than a full moon. Follow the links below to learn more about the Andromeda galaxy. Article Source…

So this was all about Andromeda Galaxy. Have you anything to say? Any facts? Discuss in the comments below.

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How to Buy a Telescope for a Child?

How to Buy a Telescope for a Child

Kids have different hobbies. They want various things from their parents as a gift. If a child wants a telescope, it is very much inspiring for them. Because, they are interested in astronomy. They can utilize their skills, observation and even knowledge.

How to Buy a Telescope for a Child
It is an important query for their parents. Parents should encourage their kids to buy such equipments. If your child is frustrated by using the same type of toys and if you want to spend quality time with your child, a telescope is the only choice to present them. There are different advantages on the side of kids to effectively use a telescope. Kids are very energetic when they are looking something to the outside. They gather much knowledge about science of the universe with the help of a telescope.

How to Buy a Telescope for a Child?

• First as a parent, you should visit an astronomy club in your locality. You can take advice about buying a telescope from the club. You can gather several information about telescope like type, quality and price.

• Visit different “star parties” with your kids. These kid-friendly events encourage their kids to buy telescope. Also, you can get valuable information about buying the desired equipment.

• As telescope is an expensive thing, so to buy a telescope, parents have to decide themselves. They can first buy binoculars for their kids. Because, it is a lesser expensive equipment and easier to use. It can be used as a telescope. Even when kids lose their interest in astronomy, they can use it for watching sports, nature or theater.

• Parents must decide on the quality as well as the price of the telescope. In case of measuring the quality of the telescope, they must consider the diameter, the optical quality of the eyepiece and mount quality. If the size of the diameter is wider, then it would be better quality.

• You should not pay attention to the power of the telescope. Because, power is not a useful indicator for the quality of the telescope. You should invest less money for buying it. Because, kids can lose their interest after a few days.

• You can also improve an old, inexpensive telescope by adding a larger aperture or better eyepieces. If you buy the cheapest telescope, its eyepieces are not removable. If you buy a medium priced telescope, its diameter of eyepieces is 0.96 inches. It would not be adaptable to a better one. The expensive and best quality telescopes have 1.25 inches in diameter. It operates at bigger area. So, you have to buy the expensive 1.25 inches in diameter telescope. If your child loses interest after some days about astronomy, you can also sell it.

There are many options available for buying this. But you may try first with a binocular which is less expensive. If your child has really demand about the telescope, you can buy the best and expensive telescope because you can sell the old one any time.

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Crash Course Astronomy: Exoplanets

One of my favorite topics in astronomy is exoplanets: planets orbiting other stars.

Astronomers have been looking for them for decades, and there were lots of false alarms, but no true planets found … until 1992, when pulsar planets were found, and then just a few years later when planets orbiting stars like the Sun were first detected.

I remember the next few years, the arguments that raged over whether these planets were real or not, until an independent observation of one transiting its star clinched the deal. Now, just 23 years later, we have a roster of thousands of such exoplanets, so many that zoological-type classification is possible. The range of planet flavors is huge, showing us that stars make planets with relative ease.

How wonderful is that?

It’s why this week’s Crash Course Astronomy episode on exoplanets was so much fun to put together. Just thinking about this topic gets my brain fired up. Maybe I can share that feeling with you:

 

As you may recall, this episode was supposed to go up last week, and in fact did, but we quickly took it down after we discovered an error in one of the animations. We’d rather get things right, so we fixed it and here it is all shiny and fully functional.

If you’re curious, the problem came about due to barycenters. When a massive object like a planet orbits another massive object like a star, it’s more correct to say they both orbit around their common center of mass, called the system barycenter. The animation you see here demonstrates it.

As you can see in the animation, the planet makes a big circle and the star makes a small one. And if you watch closely you’ll see they’re always on opposite sides of the barycenter; when the planet is on the left of its orbit, the star is 180° around on its right.

The problem we had was that we mistakenly had the two objects on the same sides of their respective orbits, so (for example) both were on the left at the same time. It was a subtle enough mistake that I totally missed it, but of course the more eyes you have on something the more likely someone will notice, and many commenters did. I personally thank those who pointed it out and freely admit we screwed that part up.

Part of science, you see, is owning up to errors. The whole point of the scientific endeavor is to approach the truth, the reality of things, ever more closely. If you can’t admit your mistakes, you’ll carry them along with you, and you’ll wind up moving in the wrong direction. In this case our error was one of display, not (directly) content, but the concept still applies.

And we certainly didn’t want to confuse anyone watching and trying to figure this out! You’re on this journey, too, and the reason I do all this is to take you along, share my joy of science, and hope that you too will delight in learning more about the Universe and seeing it as it is.

Article Source…

 

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Royal Observatory Greenwich’s Astrophotography Contest 2014

Vatnajokull National Park reflected almost symmetrically in Jokulsarlon Glacier lagoon. (James Woodend, United Kingdom Aurora Over a Glacier Lagoon, Overall Winner, Earth and Space. A vivid green overhead aurora pictured in Iceland’s) 

A week after couple of solar storms, the world witness the spectacular auroras and picture taken by James Woodend of Northern Lights effects won the top prize at the astrophotography contest 2014 held by the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

The contest lured astrophotographers from around the world and participated with their breathtaking pictures of planet and sky. Expert photographer James Woodend, a British, took the winning picture of a brilliant green aurora into the sky reflected in glacial lagoon of Iceland’s Vatnajokull National Park. “I love the combination of whites and blue in the glacier with the chilly green of the aurora in this wonderfully icy picture,” Marek Kukula, a public astronomer utilizing Royal Observatory and one from the competitors judges, declared in a release. “We was all completely in awe of this colors and symmetry of James’ shot.”

As Woodend journeyed to Iceland to obtain the perfect image, several other photographers went to great lengths to have their photographs. Patrick Cullis, an American professional photographer who took a high-altitude balloon from Boulder, Colorado, and photographed the Rocky Mountains from 87,000 above the Earth. Catalin Beldea, who leaned from open-door of an airplane about 10,500 feet above Kenya to take a picture of solar eclipse, after a sand-storm interrupted his plan to photograph the eclipse from Lake Turkana’s coast.

The Horsehead Nebula (IC 434). This image clearly depicts the well-known red glow that appears to come from behind the horsehead, produced by hydrogen gas ionized by neighboring stars. (Shishir and Shashank Dholakia, United States, age 15, Winner, Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year.) 

This year, Royal Observatory received 2,500 entries, more than double received in 2013. Some show the interplay of globe and space, while some peer deep into the sky. The Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year award was given to 15-year-old American twins Shishir and Shashank Dholakia for their picture of Horsehead Nebula 1,500 light-years away from us.

“It was regularly hard to believe that many were taken from the surface of the Earth and not a space telescope orbiting our planet,” Chris Bramley, editor of BBC Sky at Night Magazine and the contest judge, said in the press release.

The winners are displayed at the exhibition at the Royal Observatory’s Astronomy Center from Sept. 18, 2014 to Feb. 22, 2015.

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NexStar Evolution 6 GoTo Telescope Review – Telescope for Travelers

-39%NexStar Evolution 6 GoTo Telescope

Product Specification:

Weight: 44.7 pounds
Aperture: 150 mm (5.9 in.)
Eyepiece magnification: 38x
Mount: Single fork arm altazimuth
Focal length: 1500 mm
Eyepiece size: 40 mm
Focal ratio: f/10
Highest useful magnification: 354x
Max slew speed: 4 degrees/second
Materials: Stainless steel
Alignment: SkyAlign, 3-Star Align, Solar System Align
Objects in database: More than 4,000
Warranty: 2-year warranty on the telescope for damage and defects
Price: $1,200

NexStar Evolution 6 GoTo Telescope

Advanced optics, computerized controlling system, portability and simple set-up process have made it very popular among star gazers.

$1,199.00 $1,980.95

Overview:

This is one of the best products from Celestron. The telescope is very useful in detailed view at night sky. The product is specifically meant for starters and mid-level experienced observers, who are keen to gain more information on the night sky. The 5.9inch aperture accumulates enough light for detailed image of planets and stars. The Sky Align technology helps in aligning three celestial objects in the night sky. The software can be controlled with the help of Andoid or iOS of mobile phones or tabs. The single fork arm mount makes the whole system of setting up and taking down of the telescope very simple. The telescope has the highest magnification level of 354x, which is indeed unparallel in the market. It makes sky gazing even simpler and helps a lot in recognizing the stars and nebulas more precisely. Computer controlled GoTo mount with worm-gears and motors have enhanced the accuracy in star gazing.

Pros:

The telescope is comprised of stainless steel body, thus making the system very strong. The weight is just 44.7 pounds in spite of the fact that the body is made of stainless steel. The comparatively light weight and single fork mounting of the telescope have made it portable. The telescope can be controlled through mobile app called Sky Align. The same software having over 4000 input data helps a lot in finding deep sky stars and constellations. Alternatively, the telescope can be handled manually too. The rechargeable lithium battery that runs the computer system is enough to give a back up for 10 hours. This makes the observation unhindered throughout the night. This telescope has become very famous among the astrophotographers. Vivid pictures of planets and their special features like rings of the Saturn or craters on the Venus make photographers to use this telescope for more clear and lively images of celestial objects.

Cons:

The Sky Align technology sometimes pose problems to novice users, they find difficult to align three celestial objects successfully. Tripod is problematic if not properly screwed.

Product Specification:Weight: 44.7 pounds Aperture: 150 mm (5.9 in.) Eyepiece magnification: 38x Mount: Single fork arm altazimuth Focal length: 1500 mm Eyepiece size: 40 mm Focal ratio: f/10 Highest useful magnification: 354x Max slew speed: 4 degrees/second Materials: Stainless steel Alignment: SkyAlign, 3-Star Align, Solar System Align Objects in database: More than 4,000 Warranty: 2-year warranty on the telescope for damage and defects Price: $1,200Overview:This ...
8.5 Total Score
Good!

This is another premium product of Celestron. Wide varieties of applications, fully automated controlling system and very advanced optical facilities have made this telescope wide accepted among the users.

Usability
8
Performance
8.5
Display
8.7
Magnification
8.9
User Rating: Be the first one!
NexStar Evolution 6 GoTo Telescope

Advanced optics, computerized controlling system, portability and simple set-up process have made it very popular among star gazers.

$1,199.00 $1,980.95

Price and affordability:

This is another premium product of Celestron. Wide varieties of applications, fully automated controlling system and very advanced optical facilities have made this telescope wide accepted among the users. The price is tagged at $1200(US Dollar), which is quite reasonable in comparison to the features offered in the product. Customers will find NexStar Evolution 6 GoTo Telescope a good investment.

Conclusion:

Advanced optics, computerized controlling system, portability and simple set-up process have made it very popular among star gazers. Kids, students or amateur star gazers are equally interested about this telescope. This NexStar Evolution 6 GoTo Telescope is capable making an entire family enthusiastic about night sky gazing by making the job full of amusement and fun. This is also one of the best telescope for travelers.

$1,199.00 $1,980.95

Celestron NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope

-20%

Product Specification:

Type: Newtonian Reflector Telescope
Weight: 30.5 pounds
Dimensions: 28 x 12 x 8 inch
Aperture: 130 mm (5.12 in.)
Eyepiece magnification: 26x
ASIN: BOOO7UQNNQ
Mount: Fork arm
Focal length: 650mm
Eyepieces sizes: 9mm,25mm
Focal ratio: f/5
Objects in database: More than 4,000
Software: Sky Align
Warranty: 2-year warranty on the telescope for damage and defects
Price: $399.00 (US Dollar)

Celestron NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope

NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope is a new age telescope equipped with computerized controls. The Sky align technology on the other hand have made this telescope readily usable even by novice observers.

$399.00 $499.95

Overview:

NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope is a compact Newtonian telescope accompanied with GoTo technology. Mirrors are used instead of lenses to form magnified images of observed celestial objects. High quality optics, 130mm aperture, star pointer finderscope and computerized altazimuth mount are perfectly combined to point stars and planets easily and quickly. Beginners find the sky align technology very helpful in understanding the telescope and also the night sky. The tripod is made of stainless steel and setting up the whole system is very easy. The Sky Align technology allows aligning any three bright objects for easy and fast alignment process. The 130mm aperture helps in gathering more light than the previous version of 114SLT. The telescope comes with 9mm and 25 mm eyepieces to produce magnifications 72x and 26x. Observers also use the telescope for space photography as the telescope always generate accurate, bright and big image of any celestial object. The 2 years’ warranty for damage and defect is also given with the product and customers can use it whenever situation arises.

Pros:

The large aperture of NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope helps in larger view of night sky. It can gather 30% more light than its previous version thus making it an excellent telescope for areas where light pollution is high. The Sky Align software has made this telescope fully computerized; even a novice in this field can make three object alignment with extreme accuracy. The visibility increases manifold if the observer can use burlow’s length in this telescope. The CRM of the company is very much active in helping the cutomers holding this NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescopes and having trouble in usuing them properly.

Cons:

The battery power is poor and not sufficient enough to for use 4-5 hours at a stretch. The system can’t remember date and time if battery fails to work. Though the Sky Align software is immensely useful, beginners still find it difficult to align three astronomical objects in single attempt. The tripod sometimes makes problems, as it’s not good enough to absorb vibrations quickly.

Price and affordability:
The price of the product is $399.00 (US Dollar). Considering the wide array of features, which have made this telescope popular among all sorts of observers, the price is quite reasonable. The really enthusiastic sky gazers will find it affordable too.

Product Specification:Type: Newtonian Reflector Telescope Weight: 30.5 pounds Dimensions: 28 x 12 x 8 inch Aperture: 130 mm (5.12 in.) Eyepiece magnification: 26x ASIN: BOOO7UQNNQ Mount: Fork arm Focal length: 650mm Eyepieces sizes: 9mm,25mm Focal ratio: f/5 Objects in database: More than 4,000 Software: Sky Align Warranty: 2-year warranty on the telescope for damage and defects Price: $399.00 (US Dollar)Overview:NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope is a compact Newtonian ...
8.3 Total Score
Excellent!

Customers are very satisfied with the product. It deserves 5 Star Rating.

Usability
8.5
Performance
8.1
Display
8.4
Magnification
8.3
User Rating: Be the first one!
Celestron NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope

NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope is a new age telescope equipped with computerized controls. The Sky align technology on the other hand have made this telescope readily usable even by novice observers.

$399.00 $499.95

Conclusion:

NexStar 130 SLT GoTo Telescope is a new age telescope equipped with computerized controls. The Sky align technology on the other hand have made this telescope readily usable even by novice observers. The price of the product is very reasonable and within the range of middle income people also.

Rating:

Customers are very satisfied with the product. It deserves 5 Star Rating.

$399.00 $499.95